NDIS Child Therapist

The NDIS can help children and adolescents with disabilities, developmental delays or other medical conditions that seriously disturb their daily lives and functioning. The NDIS provides supports and services to participants so that they can:

  • achieve their personal goals
  • live as independently as possible, and
  • partake in their community as they desire

Under the NDIS, there is a diverse number of service providers than offer clients supports and services ranging from help around the household (e.g. help with chores, yard maintenance), assistance with self-care tasks (e.g. washing, dressing, feeding), purchasing necessary equipment (e.g. wheelchairs, home modifications), transport, companionship and engaging clients in their community (e.g. accompanying clients on outings), and therapeutic supports with health professionals such as psychologists, occupational therapists or speech therapists.

NDIS child therapist

Is my child eligible for the NDIS?

To be suitable to receive NDIS funding, your child must have a diagnosed disability or other significant medical condition that affects their development, and you must be able to provide evidence of the condition (or conditions). Generally, accepted forms of proof of an individual’s condition include medical reports or assessments, as well as reports or letters from other health professionals (e.g. psychologist). When the NDIS assessors consider an application to become an NDIS participant, they make their decision based on the provided evidence, as well as speaking with the child’s parents or carers about the difficulties the child may have, what their personal and health goals are, and how receiving NDIS funding could benefit them to improve their quality of life and independence.

Contact us to find out how our service can help you!

NDIS child therapist

Is my child eligible for the NDIS?

To be suitable to receive NDIS funding, your child must have a diagnosed disability or other significant medical condition that affects their development, and you must be able to provide evidence of the condition (or conditions). Generally, accepted forms of proof of an individual’s condition include medical reports or assessments, as well as reports or letters from other health professionals (e.g. psychologist). When the NDIS assessors consider an application to become an NDIS participant, they make their decision based on the provided evidence, as well as speaking with the child’s parents or carers about the difficulties the child may have, what their personal and health goals are, and how receiving NDIS funding could benefit them to improve their quality of life and independence.

Contact us to find out how our service can help you!

Types of Child Therapy Under the NDIS

As the NDIS continues to be formalised around the country, the number of service providers is growing speedily, and there are various types of child therapy that participants can access. Below will discuss common services of psychology, occupational therapy and speech therapy.

Psychology: Psychologists often work with children with developmental disabilities, mental health issues and behavioural difficulties. The fundamental objective of psychology is to improve people’s ability better deal with stress and challenging situations, thoughts, feelings or behaviours. In children, psychologists often help them to better cope with and regulate their emotions, expressing their thoughts and feelings, and improving any disruptive behaviours. Child therapists for psychology with the NDIS often work with children and their parents/carers with issues such as anxiety, phobias, self-harm thoughts or behaviours, aggression or other disruptive behaviours. Child therapists commonly help children to enhance how they communicate with others and better express their thoughts and emotions to improve their interpersonal relationships. Therapy also usually heavily involves parents and carers, as often it is up to adults in the child’s life to provide ongoing support and guidance, implement what is learned in therapy into the child’s daily routine, and apply strategies to boost how others supervise and regulate the child’s challenging and disorderly behaviours.

Occupational therapy: Occupational therapists work with children to increase their overall independence. This commonly includes building the child’s skillset in various areas such as self-care, meal preparation, budgeting and money management, using public transport, attention and concentration, or employment support. Child occupational therapists can also frequently help children improve fine and gross motor skills (e.g. improve handwriting), and sensory modulation issues to better engage and tolerate their physical environment. The child’s parents or carers are also usually involved in therapy to actualize skills learned in therapy into their everyday life from home and family life, to their recreational and school experience.

Speech therapy: Speech therapists help children develop communication skills and use of language. Child therapists work with children with a wide range of medical conditions or communication deficits. They help them to improve in areas such as using voice, difficulties with fluency and intelligibility of speech, forming sentences, and understanding not only the use of language, but its context. Speech therapy also advance’s children’s interpersonal skills by improving their understanding of non-verbal communication such as facial expressions, gestures and body language. NDIS participants with developmental delays, intellectual disabilities or other speech or communication disorders, or autism.

Contact Information

PO Box address:

PO Box 121, Glenfield NSW 2167

Phone Number:

0436489449

Email:

info@youthlivingskills.com.au

We will strive to respond to your enquiry within one business day.

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